Client Resources

Additional information and resources
that can assist you in getting your life back on track.

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Support Materials

Divorce & Parenting

Cooperative Parenting & Divorce – Local program that offers an interactive, comprehensive resources for parents to examine the complex reality of parenting apart. For info: 910-256-6163
Making Two Homes Work – Online educational program that examines the impact of conflict on children and how to create a more cooperative co-parenting relationship.
dc4k.org and divorcecare.org – Located nearby support groups where parents can share experiences and rebuild their lives. Children aged 5-12 can participate in activities and make friends with others going through similar transitions.

Mental Health

Bridge Builders
bridgebuilderscounseling.com
Karen Wheeler
karenwheelerlcswrpt-s.vpweb.com
Denise Scearce
coastalcarecounselingnc.com
Jennifer Sapia
jennifersapia.net
Kim Johnson
anchorpsychological.com
Heather Lanier
thetrinitywellnesscenter.com
Loralie Grigas
carolinabeachcounseling.com
Brenda Knierim
itahealing.com
Thomas Mates
matesmentalhealth.com
George Gates
gatewaypsych.com
Dr. Phillip Sharp – Psychologist, New Hanover County
phillipsharp.truepath.com
Insight Health Services – Linda Whitlock, MSW, New Hanover County
insightwellnessservices.com
Integrated Therapy Associates – Yael Gold, Ph.D., New Hanover County
itahealing.com
Delta Behavioral Health – Maggie Brice, MSW, New Hanover County
deltadbt.com
Wilmington Psych – Tom Boeker, M.D., Ph.D., New Hanover County
wilmingtonpsych.net
Agape Counseling Services – Troy Peverall, LPC, LCAS, CCS, New Hanover County
agape-counseling.org
Potentials – Shelley Chambers, MSW, LCSW, Wilmington, NC
potentials.com
Mary Christine Parks, LCSW, LCAS, Wilmington, NC
marychristineparks.com
Marcia Gadlin Gelman, Marriage & Family Therapist, LMT, LLC 717-208-8154
Wilmington NC Conseling – Charis Counseling Center, Kim Longbottom and Tracy Boyer-Matthews
wilmingtonnccounseling.com

Spiritual Health

Cape Fear Freewill – Baptist Church, New Hanover County
capefearchurch.publishpath.com
First Baptist Church – Wilmington, New Hanover County
fbcwilmington.org
Grace Baptist Church – Wilmington, New Hanover County
gracenc.org
Divorce Care – Spiritual Assistance, New Hanover County
divorcecare.org

Domestic Violence

Domestic Violence Shelter & Hotline (Wilmington) 910-343-0703
North Carolina Coalition Against Domestic Violence 888-232-9124
Brunswick County, Hope Harbor Home 910-754-5726
hopeharborhome.org
Pender County, Safe Haven of Pender 910-259-8989
safehavenofpender.com

Private Investigators

Lighthouse Investigative – Serving the Wilmington, NC area and beyond, Lighthouse Investigative stands by to provide you with the information you need at a competitive price.
lighthouseinvestigative.com
Bert Croom, LLC – Private Investigations, New Hanover County
bertcroom.com
Cape Fear Investigative Services – Private Investigator, New Hanover County
capefearinvestigative.com
East Coast Private Investigations – Private Investigator, New Hanover County
eastcoastprivateinvestigations.com

Family Law Attorneys in other Counties

Separating Together – Adrian J. Davis, Wake County
separatingtogether.com
Hatcher Law Group – Rowan, Stanly and Union Counties
hatcherlawgroup.com
Rosen Law Firm – Durham, Cabarrus, Wake, Orange, Gaston, Johnston, Mecklenburg Counties
rosen.com

Child Support

N.C. Child Support Guidelines – Child Support Resource, North Carolina
nddhacts01.dhhs.state.nc.us/WorkSheet.jsp
N.C. Child Support Calculator – Rosen Law Firm, North Carolina
rosen.com/childcalculator
N.C. Division of Social Services – N.C. Department of Health and Human Services
ncdhhs.gov
N.C. Child Support Enforcement – eChild Support, North Carolina
ncchildsupport.com

Collaborative Attorneys

Amy Ezzell
coastalcollab.com/aimee-l-ezzell
J. Albert Clyburn
wilmingtonfamilylaw.com
Ashley Michael
coastalcollab.squarespace.com/ashley-michael

Financial

Coastline Mortgage
coastline-mortgage.com

Helpful Info

From the Blog

Q&A: Worried About Money

Question:  I have been married for 12 years to my husband.  He only works part-time.  Will I owe him alimony and if so how much and for how long?  – Worried About Money

Dear Worried About Money:

Alimony (and it’s kissing cousin Post Separation Support) are paid by a spouse that earns more to a spouse that earns less.  It does not matter if you are a husband or wife, the statute does not consider gender.  Based solely on what you wrote, yes you may owe alimony.

Now, the rest of your question is difficult.  In some NC counties there are alimony calculators or formulas, but we do not use one here.  The judge looks at the reasonable needs of both parties based off of their budgets and incomes which they provide on financial affidavits to the court.  The court may consider why your spouse is not employed full-time and can even impute him with income.  If he is imputed with income, then the court treats him as if he is actually earning that amount.  In that case, he may earn enough of imputed income that you would not owe him any alimony.  Before you agree to anything, go and at least meet with an attorney and find out what they think about your specific situation.  You could end up paying for years, so make sure the amount is correct.  You could also end up not paying at all.  That is more than enough reason to meet with an attorney.  Best of luck!

The response posted above is based upon the limited factual information made available and is not intended as a full and complete response to the question. The only reliable manner to obtain complete and adequate legal advice is to consult with an attorney, fully explain your situation, and allow the attorney sufficient opportunity to research the applicable law and facts required to render an accurate opinion. The basic information provided above is intended as a public service only, a full discussion with an attorney should be undertaken before taking any action. The information above is available for public viewing and is not intended to create an attorney client relationship with any individual. This answer is provided for informational purposes only, a person should consult with their own individual legal counsel before taking any action that could affect their legal rights or obligations.

Don’t Understand

Question:

Dear Cape Fear Family Law:

Do I need to file for separation?  How is that different from divorce?

-Don’t Understand

 

Answer:

Dear Don’t Understand:

Separation is the date you and your spouse start to live separately – not in separate rooms in the same house, but in different homes.  Divorce is the legal end to the marriage, which you can file for 1 day and 1 year after the date of separation.  The issues of post separation support, alimony, and property division need to occur prior to divorce, or the rights are lost.  Forever lost!  If you want to keep your attorney fees and costs to a minimum, try to resolve things through a Separation Agreement or through the courts as close to the separation date as before.  Talk to an attorney about your options and get moving.

 

 

The response posted above is based upon the limited factual information made available and is not intended as a full and complete response to the question. The only reliable manner to obtain complete and adequate legal advice is to consult with an attorney, fully explain your situation, and allow the attorney sufficient opportunity to research the applicable law and facts required to render an accurate opinion. The basic information provided above is intended as a public service only, a full discussion with an attorney should be undertaken before taking any action. The information above is available for public viewing and is not intended to create an attorney client relationship with any individual. This answer is provided for informational purposes only, a person should consult with their own individual legal counsel before taking any action that could affect their legal rights or obligations.

 

Duct Tape Needed

Question:

Dear Cape Fear Family Law:

I am supposed to co-parent with my ex, but he is impossible.  He constantly tells the children things they should not know – how much I receive in child support, that I have a new boyfriend, or things about our marriage that are in the past.  How do you parent with someone that hates you?  Can the court help me shut him up?

-Duct Tape Needed

 

Answer:

Dear Duct Tape Needed:

It is amazingly difficult to co-parent with someone that is involving the children in disputes they have with you. I hope you have enrolled your children in counseling so they can learn to cope and handle his negative behavior.  Court may be an option, if you need the court to order him to participate in counseling, etc. However, sometimes we just have to cope with negative parenting, try to parallel parent instead of co-parenting, and get counseling advice. Talk to an attorney about your options and stay positive.

 

 

The response posted above is based upon the limited factual information made available and is not intended as a full and complete response to the question. The only reliable manner to obtain complete and adequate legal advice is to consult with an attorney, fully explain your situation, and allow the attorney sufficient opportunity to research the applicable law and facts required to render an accurate opinion. The basic information provided above is intended as a public service only, a full discussion with an attorney should be undertaken before taking any action. The information above is available for public viewing and is not intended to create an attorney client relationship with any individual. This answer is provided for informational purposes only, a person should consult with their own individual legal counsel before taking any action that could affect their legal rights or obligations.

That’s Mine!

Question:

Dear Cape Fear Family Law:

My mother passed away 5 years ago and left me some family land.  About 3 years ago my husband and I cashed in some investments and built a house.  I found my husband cheating with my friend.  Since I inherited the land, are both the house and land mine?  I don’t have to share it with him, right?

-That’s mine!

 

Answer:

Dear That’s mine!:

Separate property is generally inherited, gifted to you, or items owned prior to marriage.  The land was inherited and would be separate, however I suspect that you may have changed the title during the time you were building the house!  This happens often during a refinance.  If you did change the title to include your husband’s name, you may have “gifted” the property to the marriage so that it is marital and not separate.  See an attorney before you do anything else and have them look!  Best of luck.

 

 

The response posted above is based upon the limited factual information made available and is not intended as a full and complete response to the question. The only reliable manner to obtain complete and adequate legal advice is to consult with an attorney, fully explain your situation, and allow the attorney sufficient opportunity to research the applicable law and facts required to render an accurate opinion. The basic information provided above is intended as a public service only, a full discussion with an attorney should be undertaken before taking any action. The information above is available for public viewing and is not intended to create an attorney client relationship with any individual. This answer is provided for informational purposes only, a person should consult with their own individual legal counsel before taking any action that could affect their legal rights or obligations.

Need some money!!

Question:

Dear Cape Fear Family Law:

I left my husband last week and moved into an apartment.  I paid for it by taking ½ of the funds that were in our bank account, but my husband moved the remaining money.  The funds I took are down to less than $3,000.00 and I will not be able to live for long on that amount.  I work, but only part-time.  How can I get my husband to pay support and help me live?  He won’t give me any money!

-Need some money!!

 

Answer:

Dear Need some money!!:

Alimony may be an option for you, however there are a number of factors.  First you must be a dependent spouse, earning less than your husband.  Next, the length of the marriage is a factor.  Finally, if you are dating a new man, that is likely to be adultery.  Adultery is a bar to alimony unless your husband is also committing adultery.  There are other factors so I suggest that you see an attorney immediately so that they can help you negotiate or file a lawsuit to ensure you get funds before your situation becomes dire or desperate.  Best of luck!

 

 

The response posted above is based upon the limited factual information made available and is not intended as a full and complete response to the question. The only reliable manner to obtain complete and adequate legal advice is to consult with an attorney, fully explain your situation, and allow the attorney sufficient opportunity to research the applicable law and facts required to render an accurate opinion. The basic information provided above is intended as a public service only, a full discussion with an attorney should be undertaken before taking any action. The information above is available for public viewing and is not intended to create an attorney client relationship with any individual. This answer is provided for informational purposes only, a person should consult with their own individual legal counsel before taking any action that could affect their legal rights or obligations.

DSS and Danger

Question:

Dear Cape Fear Family Law:

The Department of Social Services (DSS) contacted me about my child.  They asked me questions and told me there was a report made.  They won’t tell me a lot, but I realize that my daughter is in danger while living with her mom.  What should I do?

-DSS and Danger

 

Answer:

Dear DSS and Danger:

First, you may want to have an attorney consult with you immediately on the investigation with DSS if that is still ongoing.  Next, you may want to immediately file child custody if your child is truly in danger.  I have found that waiting is rarely the best thing to do if you have facts, evidence, or information that shows your child is in danger.  If there is a substance abuse problem, your attorney can request drug testing.  You should immediately take action to place your child in a safe setting.  Best of luck and much safety to your child.

 

 

The response posted above is based upon the limited factual information made available and is not intended as a full and complete response to the question. The only reliable manner to obtain complete and adequate legal advice is to consult with an attorney, fully explain your situation, and allow the attorney sufficient opportunity to research the applicable law and facts required to render an accurate opinion. The basic information provided above is intended as a public service only, a full discussion with an attorney should be undertaken before taking any action. The information above is available for public viewing and is not intended to create an attorney client relationship with any individual. This answer is provided for informational purposes only, a person should consult with their own individual legal counsel before taking any action that could affect their legal rights or obligations.